Shooting Tips

Everything you need to score more goals is right here. Shoot better than your opponent. Beat the goalie. Help your team win games.

Some of the most advanced shooting tips in the world of hockey can be found in this section. A number of experts have created guidelines to give you exactly what you need to make sure your snipe goes TOP SHELF. To be the best you have to learn from the best, and that is exactly what HockeyShot’s Shooting Tips provides you. By studying this category, a hockey player will undoubtedly BECOME A BETTER SHOOTER so that the goalie never sees you coming. Shooting is without question one of the most important aspects of hockey, and this section gives you all the tools you need to succeed! These tips can be beneficial to all hockey players ON AND OFF THE ICE. No matter where you are, as long as you have a stick, puck and a target, you will learn something from these posts, we guarantee it!

  • After teaching hockey for a number of years I have noticed a few common mistakes that many hockey players make while shooting. Most hockey players do not even realize that just a slight change in their technique could result in a lot more power. In this article and video I will share three ways that a hockey player can improve their shot power.

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  • Whether you are a beginner or advanced hockey player you should always be working on your shot. In fact the pro's likely practice their shot the most and they are already playing in the NHL. To have a great shot you need to train your muscles to perform the action as easily as you can tie your shoes.

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  • Working on your one-timer used to be hard to do unless you had some open ice and a few friends to pass you the puck. Luckily for you there are a few great hockey training aids that will help you master the one-timer all by yourself (but it's always more fun with friends).

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  • Working on your one-timer used to be hard to do unless you had some open ice and a few friends to pass you the puck. Luckily for you there are a few great hockey training aids that will help you master the one-timer all by yourself (but it's always more fun with friends)

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  • Before we get to the tips I want to ask you a question, how many shots do you take in a game? 2-5 maybe, sometimes none. How many shots do you take in practice? 10-20 maybe more or less depending on the drills you are doing. We could estimate you will be taking about 25 shots a week. That is not very many, yet some kids don't understand why there shot isn't improving. If you were to take 200 shots at home in a day (an hour in the morning and an hour at night) you would essentially be getti...

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  • When you are practising your snapshot at home there are a few important practice habits that you should apply. In this article (and video) I share some of the practice habits that I think will help you greatly improve your snapshot while practising at home

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  • In this video I show you how to aim left, right, high and low and I even pick a couple of the corners myself just to prove I know what I am talking about.

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  • Everyone knows that being able to snipe corners is important if you ever want to be a goal scorer. But once you can consistently pick corners, why not take your game one notch higher and start going "bar down" or "post & in?"

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  • The backhand pass is similar to the forehand pass except that it is made with the backside of the blade. Use the proper stick grip and take on the proper hockey stance. To set up for the backhand pass, bring the puck behind your back leg.

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  • Use the proper stick grip and take on the proper hockey stance. To set up for the forward pass bring the puck behind your back leg. Keep the puck in the middle of the stick blade. Rotate your wrist causing the blade to tilt over the puck. In this wind-up position, your body weight should be on the leg closest to the puck.

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